IPv6 routing: How to configure EIGRP on IPv6 networks using the Cisco Packet Tracer

Still on the IPv6 routing series, this demonstration will be on how to configure eigrp on IPv6 networks. Everyone talks about the internet of things and how we will be able to connect everything on the surface of the earth to the internet yet, only a handful are serious about migrating to IPv6. Having written previous posts on IPv6to4 tunneling, RIPng, Static IPv6 route, today I share  with us on how to use the Cisco packet Tracer to implement eigrp6 on ipv6 networks.
Network Topology:
Eigrp6 on ipv6 network
Network topology showing three routers and five networks
Implementation:

On router0

Router>en
Router#conf t
Router(config)#Hostname Router0
Router0(config)#ipv6 unicast-routing
Router0(config)#ipv6 router eigrp 25 (puts router0 on eigrp autonomous system 25)
Router0(config-rtr)#eigrp router-id 1.1.1.1
Router0(config-rtr)#no shut
Router0(config-rtr)#exit
Router0(config)#int s0/3/0
Router0(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:db8:0::1/64
Router0(config-if)#description connects to Router1
Router0(config-if)#ipv6 eigrp 25 (enables ipv6 eigrp 25 on this interface)
Router0(config-if)#no shut
Router0(config-if)#int f0/0
Router0(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:db8:1::1/64
Router0(config-if)#description connects to LAN
Router0(config-if)#ipv6 eigrp 25 (enables ipv6 eigrp 25 on this interface)Router0(config-if)#no shut

On router1

Router>en
Router#conf t
Router(config)#Hostname Router1
Router1(config)#ipv6 unicast-routing
Router1(config)#ipv6 router eigrp 25 (puts router1 on eigrp autonomous system 25)
Router1(config-rtr)#eigrp router-id 1.1.1.2
Router1(config-rtr)#no shut
Router1(config-rtr)#exit
Router1(config)#int s0/1/0
Router1(config-if)#clock rate 64000
Router1(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:db8:0::2/64
Router1(config-if)#description connects to Router0
Router1(config-if)#ipv6 eigrp 25 (enables ipv6 eigrp 25 on this interface)
Router1(config-if)#no shut
Router1(config)#int s0/3/0
Router1(config-if)#clock rate 64000
Router1(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:db8:1::1/64
Router1(config-if)#description connects to Router2
Router1(config-if)#ipv6 eigrp 25 (enables ipv6 eigrp 25 on this interface)
Router1(config-if)#no shut
Router1(config-if)#int f0/0
Router1(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:db8:3::1/64
Router1(config-if)#description connects to LAN
Router1(config-if)#ipv6 eigrp 25 (enables ipv6 eigrp 25 on this interface)Router1(config-if)#no shut

On router2:

Router>en
Router#conf t
Router(config)#Hostname Router2
Router2(config)#ipv6 unicast-routing
Router2(config)#ipv6 router eigrp 25 (puts router2 on eigrp autonomous system 25)
Router2(config-rtr)#eigrp router-id 1.1.1.3
Router2(config-rtr)#no shut
Router2(config-rtr)#exit
Router2(config)#int s0/3/0
Router2(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:db8:1::2/64
Router2(config-if)#description connects to Router1
Router2(config-if)#ipv6 eigrp 25 (enables ipv6 eigrp 25 on this interface)
Router2(config-if)#no shut
Router2(config-if)#int f0/0
Router2(config-if)#ipv6 add 2001:db8:4::1/64
Router2(config-if)#description connects to LAN
Router2(config-if)#ipv6 eigrp 25 (enables ipv6 eigrp 25 on this interface)

Router2(config-if)#no shut

Verification:
To verify that my configuration is working as intended, let’s have a look at the ipv6 routing table of Router2 by typing in the command #sh ipv6 route.
Image showing the result of show ipv6 routes
The three routes circled in red in the image above are eigrp routes learned by Router2 from Router1. As can be seen, they all have the default eigrp administrative distance of 90 and were learned via 2001:db8:1::1, which happens to be the serial interface on Router1 connecting to Router2.
Let us see the result of the #sh ipv6 eigrp neighbors command on Router1. Since Router1 has connections to Router0 and Router2, we should see two neighbor entries. See output below:
Image showing the result of show ipv6 neighbor
From the image above, we have two entries as expected. The two listed neighbors are Router0 and Router2. Next, let’s see the ping results from a PC on the LAN connected to Router0 to a PC on the LAN connected to Router2.
And the pings return successfully. There you have it, guys!If you follow the steps enumerated in this posts, yours should work just fine. To download this lab, simply drop your email address in the comment box and I will forward it to you.
Thanks for reading and please, don’t forget to stay with me by liking my Facebook page and subscribing to my YouTube channel.
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Timigate

Ashioma Michael, a BSc (Computer Science)., MTCNA, CCNA, and CCNP holder with many years of industry-proven experience in network design, implementation and optimization. He has tutored and guided many professionals towards obtaining their Cisco certifications. Mike works as a senior network engineer with one of the leading internet service providers in West Africa.

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